News that isn’t really news

 

 

 

There’s nothing really new to report today, but is anything really new unless we get on Twitter?

Actually, that’s my complaint. People that get their news from Twitter. I taught a class in college in which students were asked by a guest instructor where they got their news.  A surprising number of them said they got it from Twitter.

Everybody’s talkin’

 

Which leads me to believe they aren’t actually getting news at all, but gossip, often erroneous.

I bring this up because former Jazz forward Kris Humphries has been getting slapped around on the Internet because of a Tweet he sent on election night. He tweeted this: “My cab driver told me that Romney won. Can I trust this?”

I’m gonna take a wild guess: No.

Whoever coined the phrase “Don’t believe everything you read” would have been amazed at the world today. A cabbie tells Humphries.Then Humpries essentially tells 900,000 followers that Romney’s the president.

There are no guaranteed rules on accuracy on the Internet. Mainstream media make mistakes, too. But a general rule of thumb is that a news source that pays its employees is far more reliable than one that doesn’t get paid. Their jobs depend on it. A Twitter user has no real incentive to be accurate.

In that light, I would suggest to both Humprhies and everyone else to get their news from someplace credible. Get it from a source you can trust.

 

3 comments

  1. Tiffany

    I get a lot of my news from Twitter, but its because I follow news sources like AP, Reuters, SL Trib, you guys, FOX, CNN, etc. I think that’s one of Twitters best features: that you can get a lot of news in one place.

    • Brad Rock

      Yes, I see what you mean. Twitter is good as aggregator, maybe as a starting point, seldom as a news source.

  2. Lezza

    I’m the same as Tiffany. Just about the only organizations I follow on twitter are news organizations like CBS and The Wall Street Journal. Sure, you can use Twitter as a tabloid so you can keep up with every movie star in the world, but it is also very functional as a real news source. And this way, you don’t have to scroll through headlines at different news websites to get different takes on the same event because, lets face it, news sources, no matter how reputable, are always bias.

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